Glasgow’s newest wedding venue gets set to welcome couples

Rotunda / wedding
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The North Rotunda in Glasgow has been transformed into a venue for weddings, civil partnerships, and celebrations.

The historic building in Finnieston which dates back to 1890 will be available to hire from later this month.

Following extensive refurbishment, the heritage property will offer a venue on the banks of the River Clyde and overlooking the Finnieston Crane.

The building is home to Cranside Kitchen – a multi-faceted outdoor and indoor dining, drinking, and entertainment venue.

The venue on Tunnel Street says it can accommodate up to 140 seated guests or 240 standing reception. 

And ‘The Finnieston Room’ is the venue’s new flexible function rooms suitable for any occasion. 

A staircase leads to ‘The Dome’ on the third floor, which has a spectacular glass see-through view of ‘The Finnieston Room’. 

The North Rotunda wedding and events manager is Kaitlin Campbell.

She said: “From intimate gatherings to large corporate parties, you’ll find the expertise, technology, innovation, hospitality, and culinary skills you need to distinguish your event and bring people together. 

‘The Finnieston Room’

“Whether it’s a Wedding, an anniversary party, a graduation prom, funerals or a long-overdue family get-together, The North Rotunda will offer customers inspiring spaces that have been designed to deliver bespoke and memorable experiences.”

The North and South Rotunda’s (the latter across the river in Govan) were built between 1890 and 1896 by Glasgow Tunnel Company.

The buildings covered shafts which enabled vehicular and pedestrian access via a tunnel to the other side of the river.

‘From intimate gatherings to large corporate parties, you’ll find the expertise, technology, innovation, hospitality, and culinary skills you need to distinguish your event and bring people together’

Caitlin Campbell

Pedestrians, horses and carts – and later motor vehicles – were hauled up by hydraulic lifts provided by Otis Elevator Company of New York.

The system was expensive to run and the tunnel was closed in 1980. 

The buildings have had various uses over the years, hosting exhibitions, theatre and businesses.


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