Scaled-back apartments plan is submitted for bowling green

St Vincent Crescent / Corunna Bowling Club
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A fresh application has been made to build apartments in a sensitive conservation area.

New architects say the latest proposals are “completely differently” to what have been made before.

The location is on the site of the former Corunna Bowling Club on St Vincent Crescent in Finnieston.

The land is adjacent to one of the finest listed Victorian Crescents in the city.

Previous plans adversely impacted on the conservation area and reduced open space, according to residents and conservationists – and planners agreed.

Developer Nixon Blue bought the site from the bowling club four years ago.

The revised proposal is for a “new residential development and open amenity space”.

Architects Page\Park say the new plans address previous concerns about scale and density.

The new scheme is for 20 apartments and not the original 36. 

The height of the building has been reduced from seven storeys to five with basement parking below.

And the plans also increase “the size and accessibility of the focal open amenity space”.

A post on Park\Page’s website says the apartment building has been repositioned to create more amenity space.

It says: “The proposed building has been moved back into the site to create a much larger open garden and amenity space to the front of the development for use by residents and the local community, all delivering a significant improvement to the quality and sense of place within the area.

“The new proposal has responded to the original 1849 masterplan for the area created by the Crescent’s architect Alexander Kirkland, which shows the former bowling club site as a site for a residential terrace echoing the listed Crescent opposite.”

The proposed building has been set back to create more amenity space

Lead architect Chris Simmonds said: “The new application is a completely different design, not only in terms of the position and scale of the proposed building but also in terms of the configuration, layout, and usability of the amenity open space to the north of the proposed residential site and within the general environment of St Vincent Crescent as a whole. 

“The result, we believe, is a high-quality proposal with placemaking at its heart, responding to the historic quality of the Crescent.  

‘The new application is a completely different design, not only in terms of the position and scale of the proposed building but also in terms of the configuration, layout, and usability of the amenity open space to the north of the proposed residential site and within the general environment of St Vincent Crescent as a whole’

Chris Simmonds

“The development and significant new garden space will result in a tangible enhancement to the area, completing the original 19th century masterplan vision of Alexander Kirkland.”

A previous scheme was refused by planners in 2018 and defeated on appeal a year later. A later application was withdrawn.

More than 400 objections were raised against the first application while a campaign explored alternative uses for the former Corunna bowling club.

The club folded amid falling membership and interest locally in the sport.

Glasgow city planning committee will consider the plans in due course while inviting representations from interested parties.


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