Scaled-back bid for apartments at disused bowling club fails

St Vincent Crescent / Corunna Bowling Club
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A bid to develop 20 apartments on a disused bowling green in Finnieston has been refused.

More than 360 objections were received to the plans for the former Corunna Bowling Club on St Vincent Crescent.

Site owners and developers Nixon Blue had scaled back plans from previous versions.

But planners said the proposals were contrary to the city’s long-term blueprint for the area.

The site is protected open space and is close to one of the city’s finest Victorian crescents.

Developers were told: “The proposal was not considered to be in accordance with the Development Plan and there were no material considerations which outweighed the proposal’s variance with the Development Plan. 

“The proposed development is not considered to better serve the local community or enhance the value of the space and is therefore contrary to City Development Plan policy. 

“The bowling club contributes to the character and appearance of the St Vincent Crescent Conservation Area and the applicant has failed to demonstrate that the existing building/club is incapable of viable repair and re-use.”

In all, 366 letters of objection were received during the period for public comments. 

There were no letters of support for the plans.

All four local ward councillors objected, along with Yorkhill and Kelvingrove Community Council, the Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, the St Vincent Crescent and Corunna Residents Group.

St Vincent Crescent / Corunna Bowling Club
The application was scaled back from previous versions. Image: Page|Park

Politicians Allison Thewliss MP, Patrick Harvie MSP and Kaukab Stewart MSP, also made representations.

Architects said the proposals were “completely differently” to what had been proposed before at the site.

The 20 units were a mix of two, three and four-bedroom units, plus duplexes, in a five-storey building, with underground parking.

Page\Park argued the new plans addressed previous concerns about scale and density.

‘The proposed development is not considered to better serve the local community or enhance the value of the space and is therefore contrary to City Development Plan policy’ 

Glasgow City PLanning Committee

Previous applications had included 36 units and a taller structure.

Lead architect Chris Simmonds said back in May: “The new application is a completely different design, not only in terms of the position and scale of the proposed building but also in terms of the configuration, layout, and usability of the amenity open space to the north of the proposed residential site and within the general environment of St Vincent Crescent as a whole. 

“The result, we believe, is a high-quality proposal with placemaking at its heart, responding to the historic quality of the Crescent.”


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